What Is Thesis Statement in Essay?

7/12/2022

When writing an essay, your main goal is to deliver your point as clearly as possible. In order to achieve this, a thesis statement will help both you and your reader to state the purpose of your paper right ahead. A good statement will remain the focus of your reader and set expectations about.

how to write thesis statement

What Is a Thesis Statement in an Essay

A thesis statement is a core to your essay that offers a concise summary of the main point and contains an idea. Usually, it is written in one sentence as the conclusion of the introduction. If you want to reinforce the statement, a thesis may be written in the conclusion part of the essay.

Remember that it is different from a topic statement. A thesis provides a central idea that limits the topic of the essay and helps to make a general understanding of what the further discussion will be about. A topic statement summarizes the theme of a single paragraph.

How to Make a Good Thesis Statement

Three main factors make your statement a good one: brevity, divisiveness, and coherency. Let’s look at each of them in more detail.

  • Brevity. Your statement should be delivered in one “punch,” meaning no lengthy word structures, only your point clearly and shortly. Best not to use more than two sentences.
  • Divisiveness. A good statement is a question that your reader does not immediately know an answer to. If the claim you make requires more thought, analysis, and evidence, it is worthy of an essay. Bonus points if your topic has space to discuss polar opposite opinions on the matter.
  • Coherency. No topic should be discussed halfway. Everything you state in the essay must be explained or supported in further parts.

Main Steps to Creating a Solid Thesis Statement in Essay

Step #1 Ask a Question

Any statement is initially a question. No need to worry if you already have a question in your assignment, but if not, do your best to think of an interesting one. For example, you might discuss:

│”Should you try a vegan diet?”

or:

│”What impact remote working has on a company’s performance?”

Step #2 Give a Simple Answer

After setting your question, you need to do research and give your initial answer. It does not need to be complex, but it needs to give you a sense of direction in your writing process.

│”A proper vegan diet is proven to improve your health.”

or:

│”Studies show that online work can improve a company’s overall performance.”

Step #3 Develop Points

Next, support your answer by developing new points. Remember that your goal is to convince your reader to agree with you, so you need to give as many reasons to do so as you can.

For example, in your essay about the vegan diet, the statement is expository. In such statements, you explain topics or make a general statement. In such statements, there is no need to include a strong opinion.

│”Each day, more people are embracing a vegan, or plant-based, diet.”

In the essay about remote work, the thesis is a key argument that supports the ideas you will write about. Such statements include a strong position and aim to convince the reader to agree.

│”The negatives of remote work are overweight by many positive impacts because it creates a better environment for the employees.“

Step #4 Review and Improve

And finally, review your statement and bring it to perfection. You should check if you made your point clear, explained your position, and had valuable key points to convince your reader. In its most ideal form, the thesis statement not only gives an argument but also summarizes your point.

Each day, more people are embracing a vegan, or plant-based, diet. It has been shown to lower blood sugar, improve kidney function, and have more health benefits overall.

The negatives of remote work are overweight by many positive impacts because it creates a better environment for the employees, shaping new ideas of what a work day can look like.

When your statement is clear and logical, you will find it easier to improve your point.

Main Rules for a Creating an Example of a Thesis Statement in an Essay

Don’t Be Broad

Bad example: does not give any reasoning to the statement:

│”Kids should read books.”

Good example: has supporting claims:

│”Kids should be taught to love reading books because it improves their comprehension skill, imagination, and focus.”

Be Debatable

Bad example: fact, bland or non-debatable statement:

│”The number of homeless people grew in recent years.”

Good example: has a clear view of the problem:

│”Homeless people should be guaranteed camping shelters, regular food, and public restrooms.”

Pick a Side

Bad example: no certain opinion:

│”There should be special places for smoking in any public place because secondhand smoking is as harmful and can lead to health issues, but maybe it is uncomfortable for a smoker to search for a special place every time.”

Good example: clear and formed opinion:

│”There should be special places for smoking in any public place because secondhand smoking is as harmful and can lead to health issues as well.”

Thesis Statement in Essay Example

In this section, we will review more possible thesis statements that may help you to get inspired to write your essay. When thinking, don’t forget that a thesis should be short, debatable, and supported by your text. Pick a side when answering a question and start making claims and reasons as to why.

  • Vaccinations should be mandatory
  • The wage gap between men and women is a real issue and should not exist
  • Online education has more pros than cons
  • Anyone under the age of 16 must be banned from social media
  • Student loans should be forgiven
  • Birth control should be accessible to everyone
  • Humanity should refuse unsustainable energy sources, or the Earth will face irreversible consequences in the next few years

Remember that a thesis statement in essay must not be presented as a question. It can imply one but still clearly state a point of view and prompt a further. With this in mind, you will develop a strong thesis statement.

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